An Indigenous peoples’ history of the United States

Stephen Jones: a blog

Indigenous cover

Our nation was born in genocide when it embraced the doctrine that the original American, the Indian, was an inferior race. Even before there were large numbers of Negroes on our shores, the scar of racial hatred had already disfigured colonial society. From the 16th century onward, blood flowed in battles of racial supremacy. We are perhaps the only nation which has tried as a matter of national policy to wipe out its Indigenous population. Moreover, we elevated that tragic experience into a noble crusade. Indeed, even today we have not permitted ourselves to reject or feel remorse for this shameful episode. Our literature, our films, our drama, our folklore, all exalt it.

— Martin Luther King Jr.

My belated education (see here) continues with

  • Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, An Indigenous peoples’ history of the United States (2014).

Having outlined her own troubled family history and her path to activism and…

View original post 2,520 more words

About Barbara Crane Navarro - Rainforest Art Project

I'm a French artist living near Paris. From 1968 to 1973 I studied at Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, Rhode Island, then at the San Francisco Art Institute in San Francisco, California, for my BFA. My work for many decades has been informed and inspired by time spent with indigenous communities. Various study trips devoted to the exploration of techniques and natural pigments took me originally to the Dogon of Mali, West Africa, and subsequently to Yanomami communities in Venezuela and Brazil. Over many years, during the winters, I studied the techniques of traditional Bogolan painting. Hand woven fabric is dyed with boiled bark from the Wolo tree or crushed leaves from other trees, then painted with mud from the Niger river which oxidizes in contact with the dye. Through the Dogon and the Yanomami, my interest in the multiplicity of techniques and supports for aesthetic expression influenced my artistic practice. The voyages to the Amazon Rainforest have informed several series of paintings created while living among the Yanomami. The support used is roughly woven canvas prepared with acrylic medium then textured with a mixture of sand from the river bank and lava. This supple canvas is then rolled and transported on expeditions into the forest. They are then painted using a mixture of acrylic colors and Achiote and Genipap, the vegetal pigments used by the Yanomami for their ritual body paintings and on practical and shamanic implements. My concern for the ongoing devastation of the Amazon Rainforest has inspired my films and installation projects. Since 2005, I've created a perfomance and film project - Fire Sculpture - to bring urgent attention to Rainforest issues. To protest against the continuing destruction, I've publicly set fire to my totemic sculptures. These burning sculptures symbolize the degradation of nature and the annihilation of indigenous cultures that depend on the forest for their survival.
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4 Responses to An Indigenous peoples’ history of the United States

  1. Pingback: An Indigenous peoples’ history of the United States | Ned Hamson's Second Line View of the News

  2. Pingback: An Indigenous peoples’ history of the United States — Barbara Crane Navarro – Tiny Life

  3. pflkwy says:

    Os EUA praticaram o genocídio quando abraçou a doutrina de que o americano original, o índio, era uma raça inferior, designaram muitas nações indígenas em nome do desenvolvimento, fato esse diante da negação aos nativos, nessa terra eles já viviam há séculos.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. pflkwy says:

    Até que alguém escreveu a verdade sobre os povos nativos nós estadunidense. Eles destruíram toda a flora e fauna, de rescaldo destruíram as nações nativas. Colocaram em campos de concentrações. Eles eram procurados vivos ou mortos, não tinha outra opção, ou iam para os campos de concentração ou escolhiam morrer.

    Liked by 1 person

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